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Protecting Girls From Genital Mutilation and Circumcision

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Protecting Girls From Genital Mutilation and Circumcision
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    Although female genital mutilation and circumcision are banned in the US, these brutal procedures are still part of a ceremonial ritual for some cultures. This issue was brought to national attention in the US when a recent statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics suggested a pinprick or nicking procedure performed by pediatricians in this country might be an effective way to discourage families from traveling overseas for more disfiguring procedures. The statement was retracted soon after its release. Dr. Douglas Diekema, director of education for the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics, and professor in the division of bioethics, department of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, discusses the original intent of this policy suggestion, and the greater issue of female genital mutilation and circumcision in the US and worldwide. How often do American pediatricians see girls who have had complications from these procedures? Dr. Maurice Pickard hosts.

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Details
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  • Overview

    Although female genital mutilation and circumcision are banned in the US, these brutal procedures are still part of a ceremonial ritual for some cultures. This issue was brought to national attention in the US when a recent statement from the American Academy of Pediatrics suggested a pinprick or nicking procedure performed by pediatricians in this country might be an effective way to discourage families from traveling overseas for more disfiguring procedures. The statement was retracted soon after its release. Dr. Douglas Diekema, director of education for the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics, and professor in the division of bioethics, department of pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, discusses the original intent of this policy suggestion, and the greater issue of female genital mutilation and circumcision in the US and worldwide. How often do American pediatricians see girls who have had complications from these procedures? Dr. Maurice Pickard hosts.

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