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Medical Industry Feature: A Treatment Strategy for Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis at High Risk for Fracture

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A Treatment Strategy for Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis at High Risk for Fracture

A Treatment Strategy for Postmenopausal Women with Osteoporosis at High Risk for Fracture
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Learn about a treatment option to help reduce the risk of fractures in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture.
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  • Overview

    Please see the Full Prescribing Information, including Boxed Warning here.

    At the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research (ASBMR) Congress in Montreal, Canada, Dr. Shira Johnson caught up with Dr. Felicia Cosman about treatment strategies for postmenopausal women who are at a high risk for fracture due to osteoporosis. 

     

  • Indications and Usage

    TYMLOS is indicated for the treatment of postmenopausal women with osteoporosis at high risk for fracture defined as a history of osteoporotic fracture, multiple risk factors for fracture, or patients who have failed or are intolerant to other available osteoporosis therapy. In postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, TYMLOS reduces the risk of vertebral fractures and nonvertebral fractures.

    Limitations of Use
    Because of the unknown relevance of the rodent osteosarcoma findings to humans, cumulative use of TYMLOS and parathyroid hormone analogs (e.g., teriparatide) for more than 2 years during a patient’s lifetime is not recommended.

  • Important Safety Information (ISI)

    WARNING: RISK OF OSTEOSARCOMA

    • Abaloparatide caused a dose-dependent increase in the incidence of osteosarcoma (a malignant bone tumor) in male and female rats. The effect was observed at systemic exposures to abaloparatide ranging from 4 to 28 times the exposure in humans receiving the 80 mcg dose. It is unknown if TYMLOS will cause osteosarcoma in humans.
    • The use of TYMLOS is not recommended in patients at increased risk of osteosarcoma including those with Paget's disease of bone or unexplained elevations of alkaline phosphatase, open epiphyses, bone metastases or skeletal malignancies, hereditary disorders predisposing to osteosarcoma, or prior external beam or implant radiation therapy involving the skeleton.
    • Cumulative use of TYMLOS and parathyroid hormone analogs (e.g., teriparatide) for more than 2 years during a patient’s lifetime is not recommended.

    Orthostatic Hypotension: Orthostatic hypotension may occur with TYMLOS, typically within 4 hours of injection. Associated symptoms may include dizziness, palpitations, tachycardia or nausea, and may resolve by having the patient lie down. For the first several doses, TYMLOS should be administered where the patient can sit or lie down if necessary.

    Hypercalcemia: TYMLOS may cause hypercalcemia. TYMLOS is not recommended in patients with pre-existing hypercalcemia or in patients who have an underlying hypercalcemic disorder, such as primary hyperparathyroidism, because of the possibility of exacerbating hypercalcemia.

    Hypercalciuria and Urolithiasis: TYMLOS may cause hypercalciuria. It is unknown whether TYMLOS may exacerbate urolithiasis in patients with active or a history of urolithiasis. If active urolithiasis or pre-existing hypercalciuria is suspected, measurement of urinary calcium excretion should be considered.

    Adverse Reactions: The most common adverse reactions (incidence ≥2%) are hypercalciuria, dizziness, nausea, headache, palpitations, fatigue, upper abdominal pain and vertigo.


    ©2019 Radius Health, Inc. All rights reserved. 01/19. TYM-US-02064

     

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